For Africa’s hunted albino children, new limbs and new hope

Emmanuel Rutema, 13, of Tanzania, rides an elevator before his surgery at the Shriners Hospital for Children in Philadelphia on Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Rutema and four other children also with the hereditary condition of albinism are in the U.S. to receive free surgery and prostheses at the hospital. The children were attacked and dismembered in the belief that their body parts will bring wealth. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Emmanuel Rutema, 13, of Tanzania, rides an elevator before his surgery at the Shriners Hospital for Children in Philadelphia on Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Rutema and four other children also with the hereditary condition of albinism are in the U.S. to receive free surgery and prostheses at the hospital. The children were attacked and dismembered in the belief that their body parts will bring wealth. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

NEW YORK (AP) — Five albino children from Tanzania who were mutilated because they are albinos are getting relief from a charity in New York.

The children lost limbs because witch doctors in traditional communities believe people with albinism have magical properties. Their body parts fetch thousands of dollars on the black market for use in potions said to give the user wealth and good luck.

Albinism is a rare genetic condition in which people are born with little or no pigment in their skin or eyes.

The Global Medical Relief fund is a New York City nonprofit that helps children from crisis zones all over the world get custom prosthesis in the United States.

Founder Elissa Montanti says she was moved to help the children after seeing a story about one of them.

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