Flooding continues across eastern North Carolina

Flooding in North Carolina following Hurricane Matthew (CBS News)
Flooding in North Carolina following Hurricane Matthew (CBS News)

GREENVILLE, N.C. (AP) — The Latest on flooding after Hurricane Matthew (all times local):

6:25 a.m.

Flooding across eastern North Carolina is still expected to get worse before it gets better.

The National Weather Service says the Tar River in Greenville was at nearly 23 feet. It’s expected to reach 25 feet late Thursday night or early Friday.

The airport in Greenville was flooded and officials ordered the evacuation of about one tenth of the city’s 90,000 people. East Carolina University is closed for the rest of the week.

The Neuse River in Kinston is also still rising and is expected to peak Saturday. The weather service says the flooding is comparable to that of Hurricane Floyd in 1999.

Forecasters say all roads on the south side of Kinston will be flooded.

Flooding was also reported in Fayetteville. Forecasters say moderate flooding is occurring and conditions aren’t expected to get better before Friday morning.


3 a.m.

Homeowners, students and businesses in one of eastern North Carolina’s population centers are keeping a nervous watch on the river that flows along downtown, as Hurricane Matthew’s deadly after-effects lingered days after the storm passed.

Authorities ordered evacuations for about one-tenth of Greenville’s 90,000 people. The Tar River is expected crest Wednesday.

Military trucks rumbled through leafy neighborhoods Tuesday where orange traffic cones and police tape discouraged people from entering. Police officers were stationed at the edge of the evacuation zone to monitor who came and went.

David Baker, whose family owns the River Bank Apartments, said all but one of their tenants had heeded the evacuation order by Tuesday, and he was spending the afternoon putting boards and sealant across the doorways of ground-floor units.

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