The Latest: Chicago protesters head toward Magnificent Mile

CHICAGO (AP) – The latest developments in the city of Chicago’s efforts to deal with fatal police shootings and police accountability (all times local):

3:10 p.m.

A group of protesters is marching down one of Chicago’s most well-known business districts and blocking traffic hours after Mayor Rahm Emanuel apologized for the 2014 death of a black teenager killed by a white officer.

Protesters walked down the Magnificent Mile, stopping at intersections and disrupting motorists. Several similar protests have taken place since Chicago officials released squad car video Nov. 24 that showed the shooting death of Laquan McDonald. Officer Jason Van Dyke, who is white, has been charged with first-degree murder.

The protests have largely been peaceful, with demonstrators calling for Emanuel and the county’s top prosecutor to resign.

The video also led to the forced resignation of the city’s police chief and multiple investigations, including a pending civil rights inquiry by the U.S. Justice Department.

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2:40 p.m.

A predominantly peaceful group of protesters has blocked Michigan Avenue hours after Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s speech to the City Council on the Chicago Police Department.

There was a small bit of pushing and shoving with officers on Wednesday afternoon as the protesters tried to get to one of downtown’s main streets, but eventually police let them through. The protesters then formed a circle in the middle of the road, blocking traffic.

Protesters also appeared to be headed for a bridge near the Magnificent Mile, which was the site of a Black Friday protest.

Wednesday’s march is the latest in several weeks of protests following the release of video showing a white police officer shooting a black teenager 16 times in October 2014.

The video also led to the forced resignation of the city’s police chief and multiple investigations, including a pending civil rights inquiry by the U.S. Justice Department.

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12:30 p.m.

Two alderman support Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s address to the City Council, saying that the Laquan McDonald video was key to sparking calls for police reform.

Alderman Anthony Beale said Wednesday he was sorry about what happened to McDonald, a black teenager who was shot 16 times and killed by a white police officer. He added that the video was a “game-changer” in the community and helped people understand “the frustration of what we are dealing with.”

Beale represents a large portion of Chicago’s South Side.

Alderman Leslie Hairston, whose ward also encompasses parts of the South Side, including the University of Chicago, backed Emanuel’s comments about people being treated differently because of their skin color.

She said she was “denied access” to the council’s chamber Wednesday until she produced ID “even though my picture was on the wall.” She said her white colleagues walked in without having to show ID.

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11:45 a.m.

Lawyers in a 2013 Chicago police shooting case say the city keeps fighting the release of video despite pledges of greater transparency.

The comments followed a Wednesday hearing in a civil case brought by Cedrick Chatman’s family. He was a suspect in a car theft when an officer fatally shot him.

A judge will rule Jan. 14 on whether to order its release. City lawyers say its release will make a fair trial difficult.

The quasi-independent review authority found the officer did nothing wrong.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel gave a speech Wednesday on the crisis facing police following the release of a video of Laquan McDonald’s 2014 shooting. The city fought its release for months before making it public on Nov. 24.

Chatman family lawyer Brian Coffman says Emanuel’s new refrain is transparency. If that’s true, he says Emanuel should order the video’s release.

City lawyers didn’t comment.

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10 a.m.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel says “no citizen is a second-class citizen in the city of Chicago.”

The mayor delivered a powerful, emotional address Wednesday to the City Council on the crisis of trust in policing as the city grapples with fallout from a video showing a white officer shooting a black teenager 16 times.

Emanuel said that in addition to better community policing, Chicago must confront “underlying challenges of family, of poverty, of joblessness, or hopelessness.”

The mayor was near tears when he recalled a question from a young man who had had run-ins with the law. The mayor said he asked him, “Do you think the police would ever treat you the way they treat me?”

The mayor said Chicago’s police must patiently build relationships, sit with parents, sit with youths, listen and be mentors.

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9:30 a.m.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel says it’s an unacceptable that there are parents in Chicago who feel they must warn their children to be wary of police officers.

The embattled mayor addressed the City Council on Wednesday regarding the policing crisis that has led to a U.S. Department of Justice civil rights investigation.

He said gun violence has become “normalized” as the city grapples with gang violence and how to reform a police force with a decades-old reputation for brutality.

Emanuel says there is a “trust problem” between people and the police.

He says the city and the police, in particular, “have a responsibility to win back the trust.”

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9:20 a.m.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has apologized for the 2014 killing of a black teenager who was shot 16 times by a white police officer.

In a speech before the City Council, Emanuel said Wednesday that the police force needs “complete and total reform.”

Emanuel has been engulfed in a media firestorm since a video was released two weeks ago showing the 2014 death of Laquan McDonald. Officer Jason Van Dyke is charged with first-degree murder.

Emanuel also said that the reforms must go beyond the police department and that Chicago needs to “reset our values.”

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7:45 a.m.

At least four different groups are planning protests throughout the day in and around Chicago’s City Hall to draw attention to cases of alleged abuse by police officers. At least one group says it is demanding Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s resignation.

Emanuel will deliver an address Wednesday morning about the police department to a special City Council session.

The release last month of a video showing the 2014 killing of a black teenager by a white police officer has set off weeks of largely peaceful protests and led to the dismissal of the city’s police chief.

The first of Wednesday’s protests, by a group called the Coalition for a New Chicago, is planned for 8 a.m. inside City Hall.

Less than an hour later, a group of Christian clergy plans to gather at an entrance to the building. Two other demonstrations are planned, at City Hall and in a nearby plaza.

On Thursday, a 5 p.m. rally is planned by the Chicago Alliance Against Racist & Political Repression.

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This story has been corrected to show that the 5 p.m. rally is planned for Thursday, not Wednesday.

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1:00 a.m.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel has called a special City Council meeting to give an address about Chicago’s police department – the center of the biggest crisis of his administration.

Wednesday morning’s speech will come two days after U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch announced a Justice Department civil rights investigation to determine if there are patterns of racial disparity in the police department’s use of force.

Emanuel has been engulfed in a media firestorm since a video was released two weeks ago showing the killing of a black teenager by a white police officer who shot him 16 times. Since then, Emanuel has forced the police superintendent to resign, brought in a new head of an agency that investigates police shootings and fended off calls for his own resignation.

Several groups have planned for protests Wednesday at City Hall and a nearby plaza.

(Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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